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Assessment of Learning Connections

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A variety of Summative Assessments (Assessments OF Learning) are used in the state of Iowa to meet federally and state mandated assessment requirements. These assessments are used to determine whether student subgroups, public schools, and Local Education Agencies (LEAs) make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). To learn more about the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) assessment requirements and about the assessment requirements identified by Chapter 12 of Iowa Code, see Statewide Assessment Requirements.

 

Statewide Assessment Data

Student achievement data is reported annually in the Annual Condition of Education Report and in the State Report Card.

A variety of Summative Assessments (Assessments OF Learning) are used in the state of Iowa to meet federally and state mandated assessment requirements. These assessments are used to determine whether student subgroups, public schools, and Local Education Agencies (LEAs) make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). To learn more about the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) assessment requirements and about the assessment requirements identified by Chapter 12 of Iowa Code, see Statewide Assessment Requirements.

 

Iowa Assessments

School districts and accredited nonpublic schools in Iowa administer the Iowa Assessments to all students in reading and mathematics for grades 3 through 8, 10 (public schools only, although it can help determine academic growth for accredited nonpublic schools) and 11, and science for grades 5, 8 and 11. The tests are aligned to the Iowa Core.

 

Iowa – English Language Development Assessment (I-ELDA)

In addition to the assessments required for all students, NCLB also requires assessments of English Language learners under the provision of Title III. Iowa ELDA is the English language proficiency assessment of listening, speaking, reading, and writing used to meet this requirement. English Language Learners (ELLs) need to be assessed every year until they achieve proficiency. This includes all students receiving ESL/bilingual/dual language services. The tests are aligned to the Iowa Core.

Visit the English Language Learners webpage for more information.

 

Iowa Alternate Assessment (IAA)

The Iowa Alternate Assessment is for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities whose academic performance is appropriately judged against alternate achievement standards. The Iowa Alternate Assessment measures student performance in Reading, Mathematics, and for some students, Science. The tests are aligned to the Iowa Core Content Standards and Benchmarks.

 

National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

Federal law requires that all states receiving Title I funds participate in the NAEP reading and mathematics assessments at fourth and eighth grades. Beginning in 2003, all states participate in the NAEP project. School districts within the state receiving Title I funding are chosen, at random, to participate. Students are randomly selected to participate and each student takes only a portion of the entire test. All students are included in the assessment with accommodations allowed for Students With Disabilities (SD) and Limited-English-Proficient (LEP) students.

Visit the NAEP webpage for more information.

 

Other Summative Assessments

ACT

American College Testing (ACT) designed the ACT Assessments to measure high school students’ general educational development and ability to succeed at the college level. A composite ACT score measures overall educational development and is based on assessments for English, mathematics, reading, and science reasoning. In 2006, 65% of Iowa high school graduates took the ACT and received an average composite score of 22.1, the third highest in the nation among states where 50% or more students took the test.

View the Annual Condition of Education Report for more information on how Iowa students do on the ACT.

 

SAT

The Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) is taken by approximately 4% of Iowa high school graduates. It measures critical reading and mathematics. Iowa students traditionally do well on the SAT with Iowa ranked second in the nation in 2006.

View the Annual Condition of Education Report for more information on how Iowa students do on the SAT.

 

Advanced Placement (AP) Exams

The Advanced Placement (AP) Program, sponsored by the College Board, offers 37 courses in 22 subject areas. The AP courses are taught by highly-qualified high school teachers who use the AP Course Descriptions to guide them and AP examinations are offered once a year in May by the College Board. AP provides secondary school students the opportunity to take college-level courses in a high school setting.

Visit the Advanced Placement Courses webpage for more information.

Printed from the Iowa Department of Education website on July 29, 2015 at 1:27pm.