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Progress Monitoring Procedures

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Explanation

According to IDEA and State Rules, progress monitoring procedures must be established for each goal.

Progress Monitoring is the method of formative assessment used to measure student’s progress toward meeting a goal.  Progress Monitoring procedures guide how data will be collected in order to make instructional decisions about the progress of the student and establish a decision making plan for examining the data collected.

Progress monitoring assists the teacher or service provider in making ongoing instructional decisions about the strategies being used.  It also provides summative evidence that enables the IEP team to determine whether the student has achieved his or her goals.

Monitoring Progress on IEP Goals

Monitoring progress on IEP goals is described on the goal page in the Progress Monitoring Procedures.  It must include the following:

  • How progress will be measured?
  • How often progress will be monitored?
  • When changes in instruction will be considered?

Alignment

IEP teams need to consider the measure used to determine the baseline performance and the goal criterion.  The measure used for the baseline and goal criterion will determine the measure for progress monitoring.

Example:
Baseline – Given a fifth grade level reading passage, George reads the passage and answers 10 comprehension questions with 10% accuracy.

Annual Measurable Goal – In 36 weeks, given a fifth grade level reading passage, George will read the passage and answer 10 comprehension questions with 90% accuracy on three consecutive data collection dates.

Progress Monitoring Procedures – Once a week George will be given a fifth grade level reading passage to read and ten comprehension questions to answer. The classroom teacher will collect and chart the outcome each week. If four consecutive data points fall below the expected growth line changes in instruction will be considered.

How will progress be monitored?

When explaining how progress will be monitored, the IEP team must include an explanation of how the student will be demonstrating skills and knowledge

In the following example of a progress monitoring procedure, the bolded portion states how progress will be monitored:

Once a week George will be given a fifth grade level passage to read and ten comprehension questions to answer. The classroom teacher will collect and chart the outcome each week. If four consecutive data points fall below the expected growth line changes in instruction will be considered.

How often will progress be monitored?

The IEP team must describe how often a student’s progress will be monitored. Monitoring of IEP goals must be done frequently and regularly.

In the following example of a progress monitoring procedure, the bolded passage states how often progress will be monitored:

Once a week George will be given a fifth grade level passage to read and ten comprehension questions to answer. The classroom teacher will collect and chart the outcome each week. If four consecutive data points fall below the expected growth line changes in instruction will be considered.

When will changes in instruction be considered?

The IEP team must include a statement describing when changes in instruction will be considered.

In the following example of a progress monitoring procedure, the bolded passage states when changes in instruction will be considered.

 

Once a week George will be given a fifth grade level passage to read and ten comprehension questions to answer. The classroom teacher will collect and chart the outcome each week. If four consecutive data points fall below the expected growth line changes in instruction will be considered.

Monitoring Effectiveness of Instruction

Seven to 12 data points are required to make instructional decisions that are statistically valid.  So, in order to have sufficient data points to make a valid instructional decision, data must be collected regularly and frequently.  Behavior data is often collected daily, where academic data is usually collected only once a week.  Anything monitored only monthly would require the whole year in order to make a valid decision.

If progress is monitored daily, effectiveness of instruction may be determined after 2 weeks. (10 data points)

If progress is monitored twice a week, effectiveness of instruction may be determined after 1 month. (8 data points)

If progress is monitored once a week, effectiveness of instruction may be determined within 1 quarter (9 data points).

If progress is monitored quarterly, every 9 weeks, effectiveness of instruction may not be determined, even after a year (4 data points).

Characteristics of Effective Progress Monitoring

  • Measures the behavior outlined in the goal
  • Uses an equivalent measure each time
  • Regular and frequent data collection
  • Easy to implement
  • Takes only a short amount of time from instruction
  • Allows for analysis of performance over time

What methods will be used to collect data?

  • Student products
  • Direct observations protocols (rubric, point sheet, etc)

Baseline must be established using the measurement of the student’s performance that you expect by the end of the goal period.  The same measurement using equivalent materials or procedures must be used throughout the monitoring process.

Who will be responsible for the data collection?

Data collection is usually the responsibility of the teacher or direct service provider, however a paraeducator, under the direction of the teacher or service provider, can be trained to collect the data.

Baseline Data

What is baseline data?

Baseline data is stable data that represents the median (middle) score of at least 3 measures.  It is collected in appropriate settings within a relatively short period of time.

Baseline data represents the current level of performance at the beginning of the IEP implementation.  It is the starting point of the goal line on a graph.

Graphing

Why put data on a graph?

  • Creates documentation and a visual representation of the student’s learning
  • Provides an easily understood method of showing progress
  • Provides information to make decisions regarding the effectiveness of the chosen strategies
  • Helps predict learning rate

A graphing application is available in the Web IEP.

As of July 1, 2009 all progress monitoring of IEP goals must be graphed.

Instructional Changes

Mark Shinn has developed a tool that will help with instructional planning. See the attached links for the tool and its directions.

Instructional Planning Form (IPF)

Directions for Completing the IPF

Printed from the Iowa Department of Education website on April 18, 2014 at 8:01pm.