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Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (PLAAFP) Ages 13-21

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Definition

The PLAAFP provides a summary of the child’s academic achievement and functional performance. For students ages 13-21

Academic Achievement describes how the student is doing in the Iowa Core Curriculum and the Early Learning Standards.

Functional Performance can be described as:

  • The ability of the student to apply academic skills in a variety of ways or settings,
  • Skills needed by severe and profound students in order to live in society such as personal hygiene, mobility around community, communication,

Sections of PLAAFP (Ages 13-21)

The sections of the PLAAFP are intended to:

  • Engage parents and students in the IEP process,
  • Establish a context for discussion by the IEP team,
  • Establish a foundation for decision making, and

These sections include:

  • Student’s Strengths, Interests, and Preferences
  • Parent Concerns regarding their child’s education
  • Special Considerations
  • Transition Assessments
  • Other essential information
  • Effect of the disability
  • Post-secondary Expectations for Living, Learning, and Working
  • Course of Study

Engaging parents and students in the IEP Process

Strengths, Interests, and Preferences

Strengths are general things the student is good at doing.

 

Interests are things, events, or people that evoke the student’s curiosity.

Preferences are things, events, or people that the student chooses above others. These are not limited to the needs of the student in the school setting.

Parent’s Concerns

Any concerns that the student’s parent(s) have regarding enhancing their child’s educational program must be documented on the IEP.

It is required by law that not only are the concerns of the parents to be documented on the IEP but that the team must address these concerns during the development of the IEP.

Special Considerations

The IEP Team must consider the following when developing the IEP:

  • Behavior
  • Communication
  • Limited English Proficiency
  • Health
  • Braille
  • Assistive Technology

Behavior Concerns

The IEP team must decide if behavior is a concern for the student.

They do this by determining if the student’s behavior impacts his or her own learning or the learning of other students?

 

The team must consider the use of positive behavioral intervention or supports and other strategies to address the behavior. The way the behavior will be considered must be documented on the IEP:

  • If yes, the team must then decide how the student’s behavior will be addressed?
    • In the IEP
    • Through a Functional Behavior Assessment and Behavior Intervention Plan
  • If no, document that behavior is not a concern

A student’s Functional Behavior Assessment and Behavior Intervention Plan must be attached to the IEP.

Limited English Proficiency

The IEP team must decide if limited English proficiency is a concern in addition to the student having a disability, not the reason for the child’s inability to succeed in the Iowa Core Curriculum. These students must have been determined to be a student with a disability that is beyond their inability to speak English.

The way the limited English proficiency will be considered must be documented on the IEP:

  • If yes, the team must address this concern in the IEP
  • If no, document that limited English proficiency is not a concern

Communication and Language Concerns

The IEP team must decide if communication and language is a concern for the student. This is true especially in the case of a student who is deaf or hard of hearing. When appropriate, communication or language plans may also be written for students with profound speech difficulties.

The way the communication and language concerns will be considered must be documented on the IEP:

  • If yes, the team must then decide how the student’s communication and language concerns will be addressed?
    • In the IEP
    • Through a Communication Plan
  • If no, document that communication and language are not a concern
A student’s Communication Plan must be attached to the IEP.

Braille

The IEP team must decide if Braille instruction will be provided to a student with a visual impairment.

Whether Braille instruction will be provided must be documented on the IEP.

  • If yes, Braille is needed and will be addressed in the IEP
  • If no, Braille is not needed

Health Needs

The IEP team must decide if health needs are a concern for the student.

They do this by determining if the student has health needs that require intervention, procedures, or services in order to access education.

The way the health need concerns will be considered must be documented on the IEP:

  • If yes, the team must then decide how the student’s health needs will be addressed?
    • In the IEP
    • Through a Health Plan
  • If no, document that health needs are not a concern

A student’s Health Plan must be part of the student’s health record.

Assistive Technology

The IEP team must decide if the student requires assistive technology.

They do this by determining if assistive technology is required in order for the student to access the general education curriculum.

When assistive technology will be provided for the student this must be documented on the IEP.

  • If yes, assistive technology is needed and will be addressed in the IEP
  • If no, assistive technology is not needed

Assistive Technology & NIMAS

NIMAS Eligibility

If the student is eligible for NIMAS this must be documented on the IEP.

Assistive Technology & NIMAS

Transition Assessments

Transition assessment information for each area of living, working and learning must be included on the IEP.

Secondary Transition - Documentation of Transition Assessments on IEPs

Iowa Transition Assessment

Other Essential Information

This section should include information that is essential to the development of the IEP.

This includes information that addresses the need for activities and supports that are not directly related to a student’s goals.
For example: A student who walks slowly due to a disability and needs an accommodation such as more time to pass between classes without being considered tardy. An accommodation such as this would need to be described on the services page.

This also includes information that the IEP team sees as useful to the understanding of the student’s current status and needs.
For example, a student with ADD is taking medication that effectively controls the student’s difficulty with attention and work completion.

It may also include information regarding the student that may require future action through the IEP.
For example, noting on the IEP that a 7th grade student who was meeting grade level math standard and benchmarks while in 6th grade is falling slightly behind in 7th grade and suggesting that the student’s math progress be monitored.

Effect of the Disability

The IEP team needs to develop a statement describing how the student’s disability effects his/her involvement and progress in the general education curriculum. This statement must include a description of the functional implications of the student’s disability and should include both in school and out of school implications.

Post-Secondary Expectations

A postsecondary expectation must be written for living, learning, and working.

Secondary Transition Section: Documentation of Postsecondary Expectations on the IEP

Course of Study

The Course of Study must include the student’s graduation requirements, progress toward those requirements and expected date of graduation.

Secondary Transition Section: Documentation of Course of Study on IEP

Printed from the Iowa Department of Education website on April 19, 2014 at 2:18pm.