Skip to Content

Goal Page and Measurable Annual Goals

Iowa Core Content Standard and Grade Level Benchmarks

The Iowa Core Content Standards and Grade Level Benchmarks and Iowa Early Learning Standards 2012 are available from the drop down box on the Web IEP.

For students in Kindergarten through 12th grade the IEP team must choose the Iowa Core Content Standard and Grade Level Benchmark that shows what a student can reasonably be expected to accomplish within a 12 month period with the provision of special education.

For preschool children the IEP team must choose from the Iowa Early Learning Standards 2012.

For nonacademic goal, such as PT or OT goal, the drop down box has the option of selecting "No standard or benchmark related to this area."

District Standard and Grade Level Benchmark

The district’s standards and grade level benchmarks should be available from the drop down box on the Web IEP.

Choose the District Standard and Grade Level Benchmark(s) that shows what a student can reasonably be expected to accomplish within a 12 month period with the provision of special education.

For nonacademic goal, such as motor or behavior goal, the drop down box has the option of selecting "No standard or benchmark related to this area."

Current Academic Achievement and Functional Performance

Enter the results of the initial or most recent evaluation and the results from district-wide assessments relevant to this goal area.

Include a description of the student’s performance in comparison to their general education peers and standards.

Baseline

Describe the student's current performance in measurable terms. The same measures must match that used in the goal and progress monitoring procedures.

A reliable baseline measure is generally the median of 3 scores of performance taken at three different times.

Example:
Baseline – Given a fifth grade level passage, George reads the passage and answers 10 comprehension questions with 10% accuracy.

Annual Measureable Goal – In 36 weeks, given a fifth grade level passage, George will read the passage and answer 10 comprehension questions with 90% accuracy on three consecutive data collection dates.

 

Progress Monitoring Procedures – Once a week George will be given a fifth grade level passage to read and ten comprehension questions to answer. The classroom teacher will collect and chart the outcome each week. If four consecutive data points fall below the expected growth line changes in instruction will be considered.

Measurable Annual Goals

Measurable Annual Goals should be reasonable but challenging expectations for a student that allow him/her to access and progress in the general education curriculum. Goals are descriptions of what a student can reasonable be expected to accomplish within a 12 month period with the provision of special education.

There must be a direct relationship between the goals and the needs identified in the Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (PLAAFP).

Example:
Baseline – Given a fifth grade level passage, George reads the passage and answers 10 comprehension questions with 10% accuracy.

Annual Measureable Goal – In 36 weeks, given a fifth grade level passage, George will read the passage and answer 10 comprehension questions with 90% accuracy on three consecutive data collection dates.

Progress Monitoring Procedures – Once a week George will be given a fifth grade level passage to read and ten comprehension questions to answer. The classroom teacher will collect and chart the outcome each week. If four consecutive data points fall below the expected growth line changes in instruction will be considered.

Four Critical Characteristics of a Well Written Goal

All goals on an IEP should be:

  • Meaningful;
  • Measurable
  • Able to be monitored; and
  • Useful in making decisions

Goal is Meaningful

The "meaningful determination" is made by the IEP team considering:

  • Is the goal clear and understandable?
  • Is the goal positively stated?
  • Can the goal be justified based on the information in the PLAAFP?
  • Is the goal practical and relevant to the student’s academic, social and vocational needs?
  • Is the goal practical and relevant to the student’s age and remaining years in school?

Goal is Measurable and Able to be Monitored

The "measurable and able to be monitored determination" is made by the IEP team considering:

  • Does the goal include the condition, behavior and criterion?
  • Is the goal quantifiable?
  • Can the progress on the goal be graphed?
  • What assessment measure will be used to monitor progress on the goal?

Progress on the goal can be used to make decisions

The "used to make decisions determination" is made by the IEP team considering:

  • Will progress on this goal reflect adequate growth according to the student’s age/grade level and remaining years in school? 
  • Will the goal be monitored frequently enough to make instructional decisions?
  • What instructional decisions will be made based on the progress monitoring of this goal? (continue, change the goal, discontinue the goal)

Parts of a Goal

Each goal must state the:

  • Conditions
  • Behavior
  • Criterion

Conditions

When and how the individual will perform the identified behavior?

Behavior

What will the individual do?

Criterion

What is the acceptable level of performance for the identified behavior?

For students 14 and older

When writing a measurable annual goal for a student 14 or older the IEP must indicate if the goal is related to postsecondary expectations.

Alignment of Goal

The following alignment must occur as the IEP Team develops the IEP. The goal must align with:

  • Needs identified in the PLAAFP;
  • State Level Core Content Standards for the student’s grade level or Iowa Early Learning Standards 2012 for preschoolers;
  • District Standard and Grade Level Benchmark;
  • Current Functioning of student compared to grade level peers; and
  • Baseline measure.

Position(s) Responsible for Services

List the position(s) that will be responsible for providing the services for the goal. Do not include the names of the people providing the services, just the positions.

Example: Special Education Teacher, Speech-Language Pathologist, Itinerant Hearing Teacher, Orientation and Mobility Instructor, etc.

Major Milestones or Short Term Objectives/Dates Expected

Major milestones or short terms objectives can be indicated for any student but are only required for those student participating in the Alternate Assessment.

Major milestones identify skills or performance levels a student needs to accomplish in order to reach their annual goals.

Short-term objectives are measurable, intermediate steps between a student’s present level of academic achievement and functional performance and the annual goals established for the student.

The date at which a milestone or short-term objective is expected to be met should also be noted.

Comments/Progress Notes/Dates Achieved

Teachers can record comments, notes on progress toward goal and date goal was achieved in this space throughout the year.

Progress Report

This text box provides one option for reporting progress on the goal. When data is entered into this textbox the report card on Page H is populated with that data.

Progress on goals should be reported to parents of students with disabilities when progress is reported to the parents of students without disabilities.

Examples: Quarterly report cards, Midterm reports sent to all students, etc.

Printed from the Iowa Department of Education website on July 30, 2015 at 12:02am.