Skip to Content

Title II - Part D - Enhancing Education Through Technology 2002-2008

Contact(s)

The goal of improving student learning with Enhancing Education Through Technology (E2T2) has been achieved in 63 school districts. Iowa’s model for change is based on the use of technology to support the professional development of teachers and to monitor the implementation of professional development training in the classroom. Technology provides the basis for rolling out professional development from area education agencies to local school districts. The technology also makes possible a continuous (7/24) support system within a school and between schools within a district and area education agency.

Given the technological tools to support innovation and implementation by the central change agent in the classroom, the teacher, the impact of quality professional development and fidelity of implementation on student growth in math and reading can be empirically demonstrated. – Gary Phye (External Evaluator, Iowa State University)

Iowa State EETT Evaluation website: http://www.perl.educ.iastate.edu/projects/e2t2/

 

Best Practice Examples

The following are some "Best Practice" examples of Iowa’s work with Title IId (E2T2) projects in Math, Science and Reading that use technology to support student learning:

  • Keystone AEA 1 (4th grade math achievement) - Keystone (AEA 1) has continued to focus on professional development in elementary mathematics as the key element in promoting math achievement using ALEX. The 2006-2007 data provides the opportunity to follow an initial cohort of students from 3rd grade to 4th grade to 5th grade. The research/evaluation question addressed was the question of sustainability of achievement gains as students move into the middle school math curriculum (5th grade). Sustainability of math achievement was observed suggesting that the elementary mathematics program builds a solid foundation for continued success in math achievement when student move to the 5th grade.
  • Heartland AEA 11 (8th grade math achievement) - Heartland (AEA 11) focused on 8th grade math. As with other consortiums, the research/evaluation question dealt with the impact of implementing professional development strategies and activities on gains in math achievement during the 8th grade. A total of 28 buildings were a part of the Heartland consortium. This included 2370 students of whom 399 were non-proficient at the beginning of the 8th grade and 1971 were proficient. Comparing growth curves across the year for these two groups of students indicated a statistically significant closing of the gap by the end of the academic year. Looking only at the non-proficient students, the estimated effect size for math achievement gain was .46. This reflects a moderate gain in math achievement as a result of the implementation of professional development by classroom teachers.
  • Great Prairie AEA (8th grade math achievement) - Great Prairie developed a new initiative during the 2006-2007 school that focused on 8th grade math achievement. Great Prairie has continued to focus on professional development at the middle school level as the primary change agent for improving student achievement. Growth curve analysis reflecting student gains in math achievement during the 8th grade was the primary research/evaluation question for Great prairie. Comparison of student growth in math achievement for proficient and non-proficient students (N=458) in six participating school districts showed a statistically significant closing of the gap between proficient (n=327) and non-proficient (n= 131) students during the 8th grade. The effect size estimate for non-proficient students’ gain in math achievement was .51 demonstrating a moderate impact of the implementation of professional development strategies.
  • Northwest AEA (8th grade reading achievement) - Northwest AEA has continued to focus on middle school reading. As with the other consortiums, the research/evaluation question is one of determining the impact of implementing professional development strategies and activities on student achievement when looking at student growth in reading achievement during the 8th grade. Student (N=1390) growth in reading achievement during the 8th grade for 23 participating buildings comparing proficient readers (n=925) and non-proficient readers (n=465) indicated a statistically significant closing of the achievement gap. The effect size estimate for non-proficient students’ gain in reading achievement was .33 demonstrating a small but significant impact of implementing professional development activities on student achievement gains in reading.
  • Keystone AEA 1 Presentation
  • Council Bluffs Community Schools Presentation
  • Des Moines Public Schools Presentation

Printed from the Iowa Department of Education website on April 21, 2014 at 1:28am.