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2011 State Report Card for No Child Left Behind

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Date: 
Thursday, September 8, 2011

The Iowa Department of Education released the 2011 State Report Card for No Child Left Behind.

Read the report.

Most Iowa schools and districts met Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) state targets for test participation and proficiency in reading and mathematics in the 2010-11 school year.

Results show 524 of 1,401 public schools (37.4 percent) missed AYP, up slightly from 35.9 percent of schools that fell short the previous year. Forty out of 359 school districts missed AYP in 2010-11, which is similar to the 38 districts that fell short in the 2009-10 school year.

The federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 requires public schools and districts to meet AYP targets for the overall student population and for demographic subgroups in grades 3-8 and grade 11. These subgroups include socio-economic status, limited English proficiency, race/ethnicity and special education.

Schools must meet all targets in every student group to meet AYP and must test 95 percent of students in each group. Public elementary and middle school average daily attendance rates and public high school graduation rates are the other academic factors. The U.S. Department of Education has put in place regular target increases to ensure schools meet the No Child Left Behind requirement that 100 percent of students meet grade-level standards in reading and mathematics by 2014.

Targets for the 2010-11 school year increased in Iowa by about 6.5 percent from the previous year for all grades in reading and mathematics and will continue to increase in the years ahead.

"Iowa educators and school leaders continue to work very hard to meet targets, but we'll continue to see schools move into these higher levels of accountability as the targets go up each year," said Iowa Department of Education Director Jason Glass.

No Child Left Behind includes consequences for Title I public schools that consistently do not meet AYP state targets for test participation and proficiency. Schools and districts that do not meet targets in either the "all students" group or any one of the demographic subgroups within the required grade spans in reading or mathematics for two consecutive years are identified as "in need of assistance." Schools and districts that do not meet goals for average daily attendance rate and high school graduation rate for two consecutive years also are identified as "in need of assistance." Districts and schools remain identified "in need of assistance" until they have met AYP for two consecutive years.

Based on 2010-11 performance, 30 of 359 Iowa public school districts (8.4 percent) were identified as districts in need of assistance for the 2011-12 school year, up from 7.5 percent identified for the 2010-11 school year. A total of 415 Iowa public schools out of 1,401 (29.6 percent) were identified as schools in need of assistance for the 2011-12 school year, up from 24.9 percent identified for the 2010-11 school year.

The stages of "in need of improvement" status can be found under the SINA Timeline at: Schools and Districts in need of Assistance (SINA/DINA) Lists  

The 2011 State Report Card and report cards from previous years are available at: State Report Card 

Printed from the Iowa Department of Education website on April 17, 2014 at 2:54pm.